Rob Jackson

Living with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)

I am a 31 year old Sergeant in the Army Air Corps and until recently was a Lynx Helicopter pilot and aircraft commander operating in Northern Ireland. I joined the Army at 18 and have spent the past 12 years living an active, healthy lifestyle as a soldier.

I passed the Army Pilots Course in 2001 and have enjoyed the challenge of flying the Lynx MK7 and MK9 Helicopter. I have served in Germany, Bosnia, Canada, Poland, Cyprus and Northern Ireland.

I am a keen sportsman and have represented my Corps at rugby and windsurfing. I cycled approx 10 miles a day to and from work and considered myself as one of the fittest amongst my work colleagues.

It was Saturday 26th September 2006. I’d been out for a run with my dog Amber in the morning and was heading out for a few beers with the boys that evening. On our return from the club in the car, I found myself sweating and out of breath, it was about 2am. I got home and remember my partner giving me grief for the state I was in. I could feel my heart racing and decided to call an ambulance as I was struggling to remain conscious.

The paramedics arrived in what seemed like minutes and diagnosed me as being in VT (ventricular tachycardia), with a sustained heart rate of 240 bpm. I was rushed to Antrim hospital and was defibrillated back into normal sinus rhythm.

I spent a week in hospital connected to an ECG and showed no further symptoms. I then had an ECHO scan on my heart and exercise stress test on a tread mill and still showed no symptoms of VT. My consultant, Dr Tom Trouton, discharged me with suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and I was to return at a later date for an angiogram and EP studies. These were both carried out and I was still un-diagnosed. The next step was for me to have a cardiac MRI scan which I would have to wait for 4 months. Luckily the Army paid for my MRI privately at St Georges, which confirmed that I had ARVC.

I was shocked, I considered myself as a healthy and fit guy, with a promising future as a pilot and until that night in September, I’d had no symptoms at all.

On 19th January 2007 I was admitted to the Royal Victoria hospital in Belfast to have my implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) fitted, which will protect me from abnormally fast heart rhythms. I was discharged the same day and am currently on 2 weeks sick leave to recover.

I am slowly coming to terms with the fact I’ll never fly again, or do all the things I’ve enjoyed as a soldier. I am lucky though, I very nearly didn’t make it. I’ve had a lot of help from my friends and family and the Army have re-employed me as an instructor.

I’m already planning a fund raising sponsored walk for the summer to help support CRY. I think their national screening programme is invaluable as most people with my condition are diagnosed when its too late.

More to explorer

FAQ’s about myocarditis

myheart cardiologist, Dr Sabiha Gati, will be filming answers to questions our members have about myocarditis to create a FAQ’s about myocarditis.